artist book

artist book

1/2

No man’s land is the distance between the kid from the ‘hood and the glass ceiling.

No man’s land was the area of mines separating the neighborhood houses from Jordan.

No man’s land is the three days a drug addict who has just been released from a rehab center has to wait until her scheduled appointment with a social worker.

No man’s land is the route a child from the south part of the city travels to their high school in the north part of the city.

No man’s land is the state’s attitude towards elderly Holocaust survivors from European countries.

No man’s land is the government’s disregard for the issue of Holocaust survivors of Middle Eastern heritage that does not even exist in the Israeli narrative. 

No man’s land is the sick body of the boy Michael,[1] who cannot get treatment because the drug is not part of the government health care basket.

No man’s land is the anesthetizing properties of reality shows that weaken the ability of an entire nation to protest.

No man’s land is the act of staring at those small screens that dull all human contact.

The child in me today no longer represses things but fights for the right to change.